My Blog

Posts for category: Pediatric Skin Care

By Central Park South Dermatology
January 15, 2018
Tags: Dermatologist  

Chicken PoxLike adults, kids can be affected by many different skin conditions. Often appearing as an unusual rash or growth on the skin, these conditions are rarely serious and actually very common during childhood as kids are constantly exposed to a variety of illnesses.

By learning how to recognize common skin conditions, parents can help identify the cause of their child’s skin irritation and then determine the best course of action. This may include a visit to the child’s pediatrician or dermatologist, who can then prescribe the appropriate treatments.

Common childhood rashes include:

Ringworm

Ringworm is a skin infection that appears as a ring-shaped lesion. The fungus that causes ringworm is highly contagious and is commonly passed by direct contact. Household pets can also carry the fungus and pass it to the child. Ringworm is very preventable and in the majority of cases very easy to treat. 

Chicken Pox

Chicken pox appears as a red, itchy, blister-like rash that can affect all areas of the body. The highly contagious illness is very common in kids—especially those under the age of 12—and is often accompanied by flu-like symptoms and a fever. In many cases the rash goes away without treatment. Chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). The AAP recommends a first dose of the chickenpox vaccine at 12 to 15 months of age for all healthy young children who have never had the disease. A second dose is recommended at 4-6 years of age.

Eczema

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, refers to a number of different skin conditions in which the skin is red and irritated. Eczema can either be a short-lived temporary reaction to something in the child's environment, or it can be a chronic condition lasting for years. Most children diagnosed with eczema have a family history of the condition or other allergies. The majority of babies who have it will outgrow it. While there are many treatments available for managing eczema, there currently is not a cure.

Roseola

Roseola is one of the most common causes of rash and fever in infants and young children. The viral illness begins with a sudden, high fever that lasts for several days with no other symptoms. Once the fever breaks—usually abruptly—the infant develops a distinctive rash, which often appears and spreads as red spots and bumps. In most cases roseola does not require professional treatment, but high fevers should always be monitored closely.

When to Visit Your Dermatologist

Whenever your child’s rash lasts for several weeks, becomes worse or does not respond to home treatment, contact your pediatrician or a trained dermatologist. Dermatologists are experts in treating all childhood skin conditions from infancy through the adolescent years. After evaluating a child's skin and determining the cause, your dermatologist will provide both education and an appropriate treatment plan for your child's skin condition.

By Central Park South Dermatology
June 14, 2017
Tags: Chicken Pox   Sick Child  

Chicken PoxWhen your child breaks out all over in a blistery, itchy red rash, there’s a good chance it’s the chicken pox. Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, and although it’s typically a childhood disease, people who have not contracted it as a child can suffer from it in adulthood as well.

Chicken pox is highly contagious and can spread from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. 

Symptoms of Chicken pox

Itchy red spots or blisters all over the body are telltale signs of chicken pox. It may also be accompanied by a headache, sore throat and fever. Symptoms are generally mild among children, but can cause serious complications in infants, adults and people with weakened immune systems.

The most common symptoms of chicken pox include:

  • Itchy rash all over the body, including the face, on the arms and legs and inside the mouth
  • Fatigue and irritability
  • Fever
  • Feeling of general illness
  • Reduced appetite

The symptoms of chicken pox may resemble other skin problems or medical conditions, so it is always important to consult your child's physician or dermatologist for proper diagnosis. If the chicken pox rash seems generalized or severe, or if the child has a high grade fever or is experiencing a headache or nausea, seek medical care right away.

The incubation period (from exposure to first appearance of symptoms) is 14 to 16 days. When the blisters crust over, they are no longer contagious and the child can return to normal activity. 

Relief for Chicken Pox

It is important not to scratch the blisters as it can slow down the healing process and result in scarring. Scratching may also increase the risk of a bacterial infection. To help relieve the itching, soak in a cool or lukewarm oatmeal bath. A physician may recommend anti-itch ointments or medications, such as over-the-counter antihistamines, to control this troublesome itch.

Although about four million children get chicken pox each year, it may be preventable via a vaccine. Usually one episode of  chicken pox in childhood provides lifelong immunity to the virus.

Fortunately, chicken pox is more of a nuisance than a concern. With time and extra rest, the rash will pass and the child will be good as new! Contact your dermatologist whenever you have questions or concerns about chicken pox.